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1- Institutional Filiation as Follows: Universidad de La Sabana Campus puente del común Chía, Colombia, Fisioterapia , margarethalmo@unisabana.edu.co
2- Institutional Filiation as Follows: Universidad de La Sabana Campus puente del común Chía, Colombia, Fisioterapia
Abstract:   (792 Views)
Background. Four of the most relevant gestures in rugby (RU) are the pass, the tackle, the line out, and the scrum. RU is the third most common contact sport on the planet and, being a fast-paced collision game, it carries a high risk of injury. Objectives. To describe and compare plantar dynamics during four sports gestures in rugby players through speed, strength and balance. Methods. 25 male RU players were included who repeated four gestures three times using Moticon's OpenGo sensor templates to assess seeding dynamics throughout the gestures. The data was stored in Microsoft Excel. An average of three gestures was calculated and used for statistical exploration using Wilcoxon and Friedman. Results. The highest mean total force (MTF) in the four gestures was located in the left foot. On the right foot, the center of pressure (COP) tended to travel faster, and the COP stroke length has been primarily larger on this foot. The line out has generally been the gesture in which the foot had the greatest MTF, and the tackle and scrum were the gestures in which the COP moved the fastest and with the longest stroke length. Conclusion. The line out in general was the gesture in which the foot had the highest MTF. This pressure was predominantly concentrated in the posterior and medial part of the left foot and the tackle and the pass were the gestures in which the COP traveled with more velocity and with a longer trace length, especially in the right foot.
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APPLICABLE REMARKS
The results of this research have an impact on the sport gesture considerations of rugby players and the prevention of rugby-related injuries.
Type of Study: Original Article | Subject: Sport Biomechanics and its related branches
Received: 2021/06/1 | Accepted: 2021/01/12

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